Hume and Hovell Track

INTRO

The Hume and Hovell Track is an epic trail in the south east of NSW that traverses rugged and beautiful countryside following a mix of public roads, fire trails, purpose built single track and over 100 footbridges.

The track stretches 426km and passes through the towns of YassWee Jasper and Albury and nearby the towns of TumutTalbingo and Tumbarumba offering a variety of topographies, vegetation types and land uses, as well as numerous points of historic interest. Along the way, there are 17 campsites, picnic facilities, numerous boardwalks and three major bridges over significant rivers.

https://www.humeandhovelltrack.com.au/ 

TERRAIN

At 426km in length, the Hume and Hovell Track covers a wide variety of terrain. Primarily, this is fire trail and non-technical single-track. Mountain bikes are required and, if doing a multi-day section, you will need panniers with camping equipment and food and water.

ACCESS

There are many access points to the Hume and Hovell Track, enabling you to tackle as much or as little as you like. We've broken the ride into five key sections, below; though there many additional entry and exit points along the route. A full description and overview is available at https://www.humeandhovelltrack.com.au/ 

You will be required to make one boat crossing during the first section of the track, and bookings are essential. Details are below.

FOOD AND DRINK

Food and drink outlets are provided in the majority of townships which the Hume and Hovell Track passes through. However, please be aware that there are many lengths of track that are remote and isolated and bike-packers will need to be self-sufficient with food and water, including for multi-days. There are only limited services offered in Wee Jasper.

FURTHER DETAILS

The notes in this section are indicative only. A full description of each section of track is available at https://www.humeandhovelltrack.com.au/ 

Section 1 - Cooma Cottage, Yass to Fitzpatrick Trailhead 71.8km

The first 37km of track, heading towards Burrinjuck Dam, is on public roads with light traffic. At around the 60km mark you'll come across the first campsite - The Captain Campsite.

From The Captain Campsite, the track continues to follow Black Range Road until the intersection with Burrinjuck Road. It turns left and follows Burrinjuck Road for 9km, and then left again onto Waterview Road. This road then enters  Burrinjuck Nature Reserve along a rough bush track. A benched single track then drops down to Lake Burrinjuck. Near the shore, a single track is used to pass around Carrolls Bay to reach Burrinjuck Waters Holiday Park.

From here, a boat service is used to cross Lake Burrinjuck, a journey of 6-7km taking approximately 15 to 20 minutes. The boat is usually available on Mondays and Thursdays for track users, or by special arrangement for groups. Boat bookings are essential - please call (02) 6227 8114 to arrange timings. There is a charge of $40 for the boat journey, payable at Burrinjuck Waters Waters Holiday Park.  This includes camping at Burrinjuck Waters Holiday Park the night prior and use of their facilities, including laundry and showers. 

From Wee Jasper two track options exist to get to the Fitzpatrick Trackhead: straight along Wee Jasper Road, or on a single track through the Wee Jasper Nature Reserve. The single track heads into the reserve and climbs steeply over a stony ridge covered with a dry sclerophyll forest. In spring and early summer the wildflowers are very attractive.

Section 2 - Fitzpatrick Trailhead to Snowy Mtns Highway (Blowering campsite) 82km

From the Fitzpatrick Trackhead, the track heads west through fairly rocky terrain before meeting up with Wee Jasper Road, and the junction of the track through the Wee Jasper Reserve.  The next 6km of the track is all uphill to the summit of Mt Wee Jasper (1,121m). Views from the top of Mt Wee Jasper are restricted, but the climb does offer a rest stop and the chance to sign the visitors’ book.

From Mt Wee Jasper, it is 4.8km to Log Bridge Campsite through mostly eucalypt forest and sometimes along the edge of pine plantations.  The campsite is a good one to spend the night. If you are not camping here, it’s another 13.1km to Micalong Creek Campsite.

The section between these two campsites follows Millers Creek and back up Pompey Pillar Creek on a single track in fairly challenging terrain. 

After following some forestry roads and footrack, the trail descends from the tableland to the Goobarragandra Valley, passing through The Hole, is on a single track and is a favoured section for many track users. It is then approximately 6km over undulating terrain to the Thomas Boyd Trackhead.

The Thomas Boyd Trackhead is one of the most used facilities on the track. It’s popular with walkers, campers, fishermen, picnickers and car-bound tourists. 

The last 5km of this section is through fairly open grazing land until the track reaches the Snowy Mountains Highway.

Section 3 - Snowy Mtns Highway to Henry Angel Trackhead 97.5km

From the Snowy Mountains Highway the track is signposted via quiet roads south of Tumut until reaching Blowering Campsite on the northern end of the the Blowering Reservoir.

Along this section of track, comprising single track and fire trails, passing through pine forest, open farmland and into the densely wooded base of Kosciuszko National Park.

A short side track at Buddong Falls Picnic Area will take you to the Lower Buddong Falls (pictured).

Along this section of track you may expect to see wild Brumbies. 

When Middle Ridge Road and West Burra Creek are reached, you exit the Bago State Forest and enter private pine plantations and later on, grazing lands. Evidence of extensive mining operations (gold and tin) will be seen as the creek is followed.

 

Section 4 - Henry Angel Trackhead to Lankeys Creek Campsite 60km

The initial part of this section of the track has been designed as an easy and interesting day walk. It’s on a single track following Burra Creek which, over 100 years ago, was an important alluvial gold and tin mining area. The mining changed the creek and the surrounding countryside extensively and descriptive plaques will help to make the mining activities clear to walkers.

Lake Mannus, in the Bogandyera Nature Reserve, provides a haven for waterbirds. From the Mannus Lake Campsite, the track becomes single track and then gravel road. On reaching Jingellic Road, you will be required to lift your bike over a stile.

The track crosses Coppabella Creek and then circles around the end of a ridge and heads back up Lankey’s Creek.  The track crosses the creek and goes out onto the Jingellic - Holbrook Road, which has to be used for about 3.5km to reach Lankeys Creek Campsite.  The campsite is a pleasant spot for an overnight stay.

Section 5 - Lankeys Creek Campsite to Tunnel Road, Woomargama (Samuel Bollard campsite) 40.6km

The track from Lankeys Creek to Albury is in much drier country and the forest, both eucalypt and pine, is much more susceptible to bushfire. 

A forest access trail takes a steady uphill grade towards the west  through a pine forest for 4km before reaching Woomargama National Park.

The track follows Tin Mines Road from the entrance to the park right through to Samuel Bollard Campsite, just west of Tunnel Rd.  There are some wild flowers along this entire section of track plus many wattles, bearded heath, handsome flat pea, and sarsaparilla.

Section 6 - Tunnel Road to Hovell Tree, Albury 74km

From Samuel Bollard Campsite located on the previous section, a single track meets Tunnel Road after about 1.6km and continues on a fire trail on the southern side of Tunnel Rd for about 300 metres. This section of track is single track and forestry trails.

Walsh, Schuback, Amatex and Hume Streets, in Albury, have to be used to cover the final few kilometres to the Hovell Tree via South Albury and Noreuil Park and the southern end of the Hume & Hovell Walking Track.

Whew. Epic. Congratulations!

 

Detailed track notes:

https://www.humeandhovelltrack.com.au/track/#map-1

Trail map

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Back

352.954 km / 219.315 mi

Total Distance

5,902 m / 19,364 ft

Total Ascent

6,262 m / 20,546 ft

Total Descent

1,239 m / 4,065 ft

Highest Point

Ride type:
Mountain biking
Road riding
Sightseeing
Commuter
Rail Trail
Gravel
Various
EPIC Ride
Difficulty: Advanced (Black)
Ride Duration: Multi-day
Fitness Level: High
MTB Segment: cross country
Terrain:
Shared Bike Path - Paved
Shared Bike Path - Dirt
On-Road Bike Lane
On-Road
Off-Road - Fire Trail
Off-Road - Rail Trail
Off-Road - Single Track
Off-Road - Downhill
Gravel Road
Trail Signage: Excellent
Mobile Coverage: Nil
Estimated Distance: 426.0
Services:
Water
Food
First Aid
Toilets
Bike hire
Carparking
Bike servicing
Accessible by bike
Accessible by car
Accessible by public transport
Accessible by shuttle
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